FarmEats Wacky Weather Chili!

FarmEats Wacky Weather Chili!

FarmEats Grass Fed Beef Chili

FarmEats Wacky Weather Chili!

One day we get a Polar Vortex, next it feels like Spring! 
These sort of Wacky Weather days, call out for a nice rich and nourishing bowl of FarmEats Grass Fed Beef Chili! 
What I love about chili is that it is relatively easy to make, can use all sorts of different ingredients, and cooks slow and low to meld those different ingredients into a cohesive chili!  

The other day we got out our 9 quart Cuisinart Dutch Oven and sautéed 2 chopped onions and garlic in olive oil.  I added in dried spices; Mexican chili powder and smoked Spanish paprika and mixed them into the sautéed onions with some beef stock to bring out the flavors.  

The biggest issue with making chili at this time of year, is that we don't have any fresh- decent tomatoes (yeah next year I will jar up those summertime farmers market tomatoes).  I have tried all sorts of different tomato options -mealy gassed supermarket, vine ripened ones, jared tomato sauce, paste, San Marzano canned, etc., and have found that Pomi chopped tomatoes are the real deal.  It is a box of pure chopped tomatoes that taste as close as possible to summer.

I pour in 2 boxes of Pomi into the mix, and simmer.  You can add in a touch of beer/wine and sea salt.  Next, I mix in 2 pounds of FarmEats 100% grass fed ground beef, and continue to simmer.  While simmering, chop up some root veggies; carrots, turnips, rutabaga, (whatever root veggies that will add an interesting flavor balance to the chili) and add to the mix.  Let simmer for a couple of hours (slow and low) stirring occasionally to prevent it from burning.  Taste the chili, add in more chili powder or grind up dried soaked chilis- if need more flavor. Add in a couple of (canned) kidney beans, then chopped potatoes and simmer for another 45 minutes or until potatoes are soft. 

Garnish with fresh herbs, serve with sliced avocado, grated cheese, chips, french fries, on top of a burger or sausage, in a frittata- so many options!

FarmEats Grass Fed Beef Chili

FarmEats Gift Certificates!

GIVE THE PERFECT GIFT;  

A FARMEATS GIFT CERTIFICATE!

FarmEats gift Certificate

The perfect choice for that special someone, your; wife, husband, kids, dad, mom, brother, sister, friend, coworker, boss, nanny, teacher, coach, or yourself!  

Good towards any available FarmEats' grass fed, pasture raised beef, up to the value of the gift certificate.

Easy to redeem;  

email Drew George at info@FarmEats.com and advise which FarmEats grass fed, pasture raised; steaks, ground beef, roasts, stew beef, bones or any available item that you would like- up to the gift certificate value, at www.farmeats.com/shop/  

FarmEats in Westchester Magazine December 2015 Issue!

Grass-Fed, Local Beef Delivered To Your Doorstep

Eat healthier meat without stepping off your front porch.

BY LUCY BAKER

A steak is a steak, right? Well, not exactly. There are many benefits to buying local grass-fed beef. For one thing, you can be sure the cows are treated humanely. Another thing is that grass-fed meat has a bolder flavor without being overly fatty. 

A top local meat purveyor is Drew George who, in 2014, started FarmEats, a company that delivers New York pasture-raised beef to your door.

The FarmEats cows come from Sweet Tree Farm in Schoharie County (just west of Albany County), where they are raised without confinement and humanely slaughtered. The beef is dry-aged for two weeks and then flash-frozen. Of course, there are choice cuts, like porterhouse steaks ($25 per pound), filet mignon ($29 per pound), and brisket ($11 per pound). But this is a nose-to-tail operation, so beef hearts ($5 per pound), liver ($5 per pound), and bones ($5 per pound)—which are perfect for slow-simmering stock—are also available.

FarmEats delivers all over Westchester County; orders placed online typically arrive within two business days. “I want to educate people about how to cook grass-fed beef,” says George. To that end, he includes a wealth of cooking information on his website, plus recipes for everything from grass-fed beef fajitas, and beef stew with smoked paprika, to the perfect grass-fed burger. 

Source: http://www.westchestermagazine.com/Westche...

Seasonal Chef: Making a Quick and Easy Dinner

Seasonal Chef: Making a Quick and Easy Dinner.

By Maria Reina, The Seasonal Chef, Lohud Food Blog, August 5, 2015

www.food.lohudblogs.com/2015/08/05/seasonal-chef-quick-and-easy-dinner/

Seasonal Chef, Farmers Market ingredients 

Seasonal Chef, Farmers Market ingredients 

Article by Maria Reina, Bella Cucina Maria, Seasonal Chef:  www.bellacucinamaria.com  A writer and chef specializing in cocktail parties, intimate dinners and recreational cooking classes.

Whether I am speaking to people in a cooking class, demo at a farmers market, or just in conversation at home, I am invariably asked what I make for a regular dinner. In a typical seven-day week I am cooking at least five, maybe six days. That could be anything from my personal chef work, a cooking class or recipe testing. When the evening rolls around for us I am looking for a quick and easy dinner. Sometimes not having a plan can yield a very tasty  meal. Sunday night always seems to be that opportunity for me. This past weekend I did the challenge I give to participants in my cooking classes: Put down the cookbook, open the ‘fridge and pull out what you have to make a meal. You just need to trust yourself and throw a little caution to the wind to make a quick and easy dinner.

seasonal chef

My goal was do make this dinner in less than an hour and in no more than two cooking vessels. I was successful on both counts. I don’t have a recipe per se for this experiment, only a few notes I quickly jotted down while cooking. My start time, when I took the picture at the top of this post, was 7:20 pm. The first thing was to get the potatoes started. I had about 1 1/2 lbs of small Adirondeck Red from MX Morningstar Farm. In a heavy bottom pot I added the whole potatoes to 6 cups of cold water and 1/2 cup of kosher salt. It sounds like a lot of salt, and I generally don’t use that much, but I was experimenting. The potatoes turned out to be really delicious. In addition to the the great flavor, the color was amazing.

seasonal chef

While the potatoes were coming up to a boil, then simmering, I started the sauté. First In the pan was a bunch of spring raab from Gaia’s Breath Farm. I used a non-stick pan, which ended up being pretty smart in the end. I sautéed the raab in olive oil with two sliced garlic cloves and an pinch of salt and red chili flakes. After sautéing for about 3-5 minutes I added a 1/4 cup of water and let it steam for another 3-5 minutes. Then removed to a platter.

FarmEats grass fed beef

FarmEats grass fed beef

While the raab cooked I made the meatballs. I had 3/4 pound ground beef from the vendor Farm Eats. After my demo on Sunday at the the Irvington Farmers Market, I got to talking with him and decided to give his ground meat a try. I was pleasantly surprised, the meatballs were phenomenal.

To the meat I added 1 beaten egg, 1/4 cup grated parmigianno reggiano, 1/4 cup chopped parsley and a teaspoon each of kosher salt and ground black pepper. Adding a little more oil to the pan I cooked the meatballs for about 5 minutes, shaking occasionally to brown them on all sides.

FarmEats grass fed beef

FarmEats grass fed beef

While the meatballs cooked I chopped the spring onion and fairy tale eggplant, from MX Morningstar Farm, ending up with 1/2 cup of onion and 1 cup of eggplant. You can add whatever vegetables you have it at point. Mushrooms and/or peppers would work well too. I added them right into the pan while the meatballs cooked. This step ended with about 12 minutes cook time on the meatballs and 6 minutes on the vegetables. (So say my notes!)

seasonal chef

 

While that was going on I sliced 1 pint of Juliet tomatoes, also from MX Morningstar. I didn’t want to to overcook the meatballs, so they were removed and temporarily set on the raab platter. I really wanted to keep the integrity of the tomatoes and only cooked then for about 5 minutes, cut side down. The pan was a little sticky and dry, so I added 1/2 cup of hot water to deglaze it. That worked like a dream, and thickened everything up.  I added the meatballs back to the pan, tossed them with my “sauce” and turned off the heat.

At some point during the middle of all that sautéing the potatoes finished cooking. Being small the cook time was fast, maybe 10-15 minutes after the initial boil. I drained and set them aside. I was just about ready to start plating all this fabulousness, and decided to just clean up my counter top and cutting board. The pan was still warm and so were the potatoes, giving me a few minutes to spare.

Seasonal chef making a quick and easy dinner

Seasonal chef making a quick and easy dinner

Just as I finished quartering the potatoes, ready to load up the platter, I glanced at my stove clock. Amazingly it registered 8:10 pm. Frankly I was a little surprised myself! A forty minute dinner, with a little cleanup in between?

Seasonal chef Making a quick and easy dinner

Seasonal chef Making a quick and easy dinner

By 8:20 we were sitting down at the table. While this might not be the most glamorous picture I’ve ever done, the flavors were all there and made for a perfect end to the weekend. Every single ingredient, even the bread on the plate from Wave Hill Breads, came from the farmers market. The end result was four portions, or two dinners for me and my husband, under $30 and under an hour to prepare.


Source: http://food.lohudblogs.com/2015/08/05/seas...

Pick up FarmEats Grass Fed Beef at the Bronxville Farmers Market!

Order FarmEats Grass Fed Beef at FarmEats.com  and pick up your order at the

Bronxville Farmers Market!

Every Saturday May 9th thru November 21st, 8:30am to 1pm

Stone Place, Bronxville, NY

Come by and shop at the 38 vendors offering a wide range of products: fresh produce & herbs; fruits; pasture raised & grass fed livestock including beef, poultry and eggs; fish from Montauk; honey, maple syrup; jams; pickles; cheeses; breads & baked goods; quiche, dips, soups; lavender plants & products; local wines; locally brewed beer & ale; olive oil, cold pressed veggie juices; healthy dog treats; field-cut wild flowers & bedding plants; cooking sauces & rubs; Greek yogurt; handmade soaps & lotions; handspun local wools for knitting; Indian chutney; ice cream pops, sandwiches and in pints; brownies in a zillion ways; gourmet pies; exotic spices & chocolate; pastas and charcuterie; cold brew coffee and tea; gluten-free snacks...some dehydrated, raw or baked; specialty chili; wide variety of gluten-free baked goods and some vegan.